Tuesday, 9 July 2013

Labeling

Labeling is any written, electronic, or graphic communications on the packaging or on a separate but associated label. Sellers must label products.The label may be a simple tag attached to the product or an elaboratelydesigned graphic that is part of the package. The label might carry only the brand name or a great deal of information.
 
 
 
 
 
Purposes of Labeling:
Labels perform several functions:
1.Brand  Identification – 
The label identifies the product or brand.
2.Product Grading – 
The label might also grade the product; canned fruitsare grade labeled A, B and C.
3.Product Description – 
The label describes the product: who made it, whereit was made, when it was made, what it contains, how it is to be used, andhow to use it safely.
4.Product Promotion – 
The label might promote the product throughattractive graphics.

Labeling 
Decisions:
1.Brand Name:
It is necessary for the label to contain the brand name. It has to be decidedthat how should that brand name appear on the product. It is advisable toscale the logo as large as possible in keeping with the overall design, whilemaintaining a control space around the logo of 1/2 inch.
2.Label Text, Graphics and Design:
Text, graphics and design on the label must be carefully selected becauselabel in as important part of branding process. It plays a role incommunicating the image and identity of a company.
3.Features and Benefits:
Listing a product’s key benefits on its label helps support the brand promiseand can help differentiate the product from others, while reaching out tocustomers seeking those particular benefits.
4.Weights and Measures
Weights on measure of a product are important for stocking, inventory andselection. There are international standards that apply for formatting thisinformation. Identifying the weights and measures of products helpscustomers select the appropriate amount of product to suit their needs. Whilethere are no consistent worldwide standards, in the United States and manyother countries, the information is highly regulated by truth-in-labeling laws.
5.Instructions for Use
Listing a product’s key benefits on its label helps support the brand promiseand can help differentiate the product from others, while reaching out tocustomers seeking those particular benefits
6.Package Inserts
Package inserts, which may contain instructions for using a product, aremade when the information cannot fit on the product itself.
7.Safety Hazards
Possible dangers that could result frommisusing a product must beidentified on products to reduce liability and comply with regulations.
8.Statement of Contents
The contents of a product must be accurately described on its packaginglabel according to local regulations.
9.Nutritional Labeling (incase of Food Products): 
 Nutritional labeling should clearly state the amounts of protein, fat,carbohydrates, and calories contained in products, as well as their vitaminand mineral content as a percentage of the recommended daily allowance.
10Additional Labeling:
Additional labeling includes open dating (to describe freshness), unit pricing(to state the product cost in standard measurement units), grade labeling (torate the quality level), and percentage labeling (to show the percentage of each important ingredient).
11.Labeling Laws

Labels must comply with local or international truth-in-packaging-and-labeling laws, as well as regulations on hazard warnings and othedeclarations

0 comments:

Post a Comment